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Trick Tips


Street tips


 

180-Flip
A 180-flip is a kickflip and a 180 shove-it put together. If you know how to do both of those tricks pretty nicely, you'll get this pretty fast. You have to position your feet as you would in a kickflip, except that your leading foot should be hanging off by about an inch. Then, that pop an ollie, move your trailing foot to the heel side, kick your leading foot off the board to the heel side, let it spin, and land. This is one of those tricks that come differently to everyone. It might take you two days, it might take you two weeks. .

360-Flip
A 360-flip is the same thing as a 180-flip, except that you do a 360 Shove-It instead of a 180 one. You should learn the 360 shove-its before trying this move. It's pretty hard, but you have to be able to land the 180-flip perfectly. All you do is spin the board a little faster and jump a little higher. This is one of the more advanced moves, so once you get it, you can consider yourself really good.
5-0s are pretty hard. Before you even try to do them learn how to do a tail manual. After that just do everything like the 50-50, but land on the back truck so that the tail isn't touching the curb. When you're done sliding pivot off.
Hints: If your having problems landing the back truck on the curb, try stalling. Just stand next to the curb, pop an ollie, land the back truck on the curb, and pivot off. Do that a few times and you'll be able to do the real grind perfectly.

50-50 Grind
The 50-50 is probably the easiest grind. The hardest part is finding a slick surface. All you do is go pretty fast then pop an ollie and land on the surface. Both of your trucks should be on the surface. Now, just slide and when you're finished with that pivot off the curb or whatever.
Hints: If your having problems landing both trucks on the curb, try stalling. Just stand next to the curb, pop an ollie, land both trucks on the curb, and pivot off. Do that a few times and you'll be able to do the real grind perfectly.

Acid Drop
Acid drops are pretty easy to do. Just stay on the ground holding your board, run a little, jump up, put the board below you, and smack it down. You can also do this move of benches and stuff. You can do acid drops with 180s, 360s, and stuff like that. Be careful though, cause if you weigh a lot you might but pressure cracks in your board and make it break. There is another version of it, where you go off a curb with a manual. Sounds easy? It is. The first version has some variations. You can hold the tail and throw it under your feet, you can hold the nose, and do sort of a standing ollie into it, or you can make up your own crap. Oh yeah, this is pretty much an old school move.

B/S 180
To do a Backside 180, pop an Ollie, but as the board goes up push your trailing foot to the heel side and your leading foot to the toe side. Move your whole body clockwise starting with your shoulders (your board should follow you) and land. As you land try to keep your balance in the middle of the board.
Hints: For some reason this move is a lot harder then the F/S 180. The important thing to remember is to just give it all your turning power and keep the board directly under your feet or you won't land it.

B/S Boardslide
This is the easiest of the slide tricks and will get you used to the feeling of how your board slides on different obstacles. It also serves as a good warm-up trick on an obstacle for more advanced skaters, in order to gauge how that particular obstacle slides. Approach the object at a very mellow angle. Pop an ollie and get your nose and front truck up and over the object, landing on the deck between the trucks. Center your weight over the board and slide until the end of the obstacle. When nearing departure from the object, start to turn yourself and your board 90 degrees, but don't be too anxious or your wheels will hit the object before you come off. A slight bounce off of the end of the object allows you to fly off the end instead of dropping straight down to the ground. Depending on the obstacle, this trick sometimes requires you to lift your front truck over the obstacle while coming off. To do this, put pressure on your tail as you turn off the object, as if you're doing a kickturn in the air.

B/S Lipslide
First get comfortable with ollies and backside ollies. Approach the obstacle going fast, real fast, and almost parallel to the thingy your going to lipslide. Ollie ! ! Enough to get your back wheels over what you are lipsliding. Touch down on the thing you're sliding, keeping your shoulders parallel and your legs in a shifty position, sliding and lookin' sick. As you approach the end of the obstacle, put a little bounce in your knees and come flying off the end as you shift your legs back to parallel.

Bluntslide
Approach the obstacle with your back facing it with a good amount a speed to hook up a long slide. Make sure you are going almost parallel to the obstacle and just barely towards it. Get into a blunt slide by popping a high ollie like you want to get on top of the obstacle. During your ollie, turn your board frontside 90 degrees with your back foot and lock in your tail to blunt. Slide it for as long as you can balancing yourself by putting more or less pressure on your front or back front. Pop out by putting a small amount of pressure on your back foot and turning back 90 degrees backside directing your board with your front foot. Land it with no toe touch and roll away clean

Crooked Grind
K-Grinds are one of the hardest grinds. Before you even try to do them learn how to do a nose manual. After that just do everything like the 5-0, but land on the front truck so that the nose isn't touhing the curb. When you're done sliding pivot off.
Hints: If your having problems landing the front truck on the curb, try stalling. Just stand next to the curb, pop an ollie, land the front truck on the curb, and pivot off. Do that a few times and you'll be able to do the real grind perfectly.


Double Flip
To do a double flip, put your feet in the same position as in a kickflip, but your leading foot should be hanging off the board slightly more and should be further back than for a kickflip. Pop a kickflip and as you slide your leading foot forward slide it off your board with a very fast motion. This should make the board spin faster than a kickflip. While it's spinning bring your leading foot back. Once it has spun around twice, smack the board down with both feet.
Hints: This one may take a while until you can get it to spin around twice perfectly, then you will be sorted.


Half-Cab
A half-cab is basically a f/s 180 while riding fakie. (If your regular, your right foot should be on the NOSE (the front) of the board, and your left should be in the middle.) Pop a fakie ollie, move your leading foot to the toe side and your trailing foot to the heel side. Your board should follow you. Once you finish the 180 smack the board down and ride away. Some people (including myself at first) feel kind of awkward about this trick since your back is facing the way your going. Don't worry about this. Half-Cabs are actually a lot easier to spin the regualr 180s. And ever though you might fall off at first, wait, till you start doing 180-half cab-180 sequence and you'll feel like you accomplished something.
Tips: This move is easier to do moving, although you will fall off the first few times. Just learn how to balance it. Try spinning the board with your whole body, and mainly your shoulders.

Heelflip
To do a heel flip, put your feet in the same position as in an kick flip, but your leading foot should not be hanging off the board as much. Your toes should be lined up with the toe side of the board. Pop an ollie and as you slide your leading foot forward kick it off your board to the toe side. This should make the board spin the opposite way of a kick flip. The important thing is that you have to get your leading foot out of the way. Then, when it spins halfway, bring it back, and as the board finishes spinning smack it down with both feet.
Tips: It might take a while to get used to flipping the board the opposite way to a kickflip, but once you've learnt it, you won't loose the skill..

F/S 180
To do a frontside 180, pop an ollie, but as the board goes up push your trailing foot to the toe side and your leading foot to the heel side. Move your whole body counter clockwise (your board should follow you) and land. As you land try to keep your balance in the middle.
Tips: Just ollie pretty high and keep your feet above the bolts at all times. Oh yeah, this move is easier to do moving, although you will fall off pretty badly the first few times you try it. Just learn how to balance it. And don't wuss out, cause if you do, you'll end up being more hurt.

F/S Boardslide
This trick can be intimidating, especially since it's the first blindside trick that a skater usually learns. Approach the obstacle frontside at a mellow angle. Pop an ollie and get your nose and front truck up and over the object, landing on the deck between the trucks. If you plan on landing in your regular stance, keep your shoulders facing the same direction the whole time and let your hips do the turning. If you plan on landing fakie, your shoulders should be facing backside with the board while sliding. Come off the object using the same method as you would for a backside boardslide.

F/S Lipslide
Performed by Dorian Tucker-filmed by Spencer Little
In order to execute the very popular and attractive lipslide, learn boardslides and frontside 180s first. Approach the obstacle as you would for a 50-50. Pop your ollie and start turning yourself (and your board) frontside, making sure your back truck is high enough to go over the obstacle. Once you are hovering above the object, perpendicular to it, land in the boardslide position. From here on out, it's just like the ol' boardslide; just cruise along that rail or ledge as long as you can and come off like you would a boardslide. No, wait, scratch that. If you're bustin' this lipslide on a ledge, then your back wheels should be sliding along on top of the ledge. When it comes time to come off the ledge, put pressure on your tail so that all your weight is on your back two wheels. Then turn your board forward and roll off of the end of the ledge. There, that's better.

Freestyle 360 shuv-it (without an Ollie) This trick isn't like the ollie 360 shuv-it, it looks quite different. There is a point to learning it, when done properly the board will spin very fast, It's possible to do 540 and 720 shuv-its like this with enough practice. On to the trick,
1. Rolling forward place your back foot somewhere between the back bolts and the tail. Place your front foot on the nose with your toes facing the direction you are going (side of your foot parallel to the side of the board). These next two steps need to be done smoothly together.
2. Apply pressure on your front foot, not poping the board. This will bring the back end up a bit.
3. As the back comes up push the board around with your back foot, behind you hard.
4. The board (should) spin clockwise (for regular people), it will probably spin forward and to the right (regular). Jump in that direction to stay over the board.
5. Land, ride away
6. Practise!


Kickflip
To do a kick flip, put your feet in the same position as in an ollie, but your leading foot should be hanging off the board by about two inches on the heel side and should be at a forty five degree angle. Pop an ollie and as you slide your leading foot forward slide it off your board with a fast motion. Sort of kick it off. This should make the board spin. While it's spinning bring your leading foot back. As it finishes spinning smack the board down with both feet.
Hints: Don't try to pop your board too high at first. Instead just pop it high enough for it to make a full turn. This makes landing it a lot easier. Try to keep both feet directly above the board during the trick. Once you get really good at kick flipping try doing a double flip. All you do for it is spin the board faster and jump higher. (It's two kick flips in one).

Kickflip Nose Wheelie - Lickflip Nose Manual
This trick is sure to impress folks no matter where you go, but in order to pull it off you'd better have a decent and consistent kickflip, since that is only the beginning of the trick. Roll up to the curb or obstacle just as if you were going to kickflip up it. When you flip your flip, let your front foot just hang there above the nose as your board flips around. When you see the grip tape again, stop the spin with your back foot, then get your front foot on that nose and bring it down before the back wheels touch. Now that you're in the nose manual position, just ride it on out. And remember, you didn't really land it if your back wheels hit the obstacle when you came off, so try it again.

Kickflip B/S Tailslide
Can you guess what two tricks you should learn before trying this? Yup, kickflips and backside tailslides. Approach the obstacle just like you were going to do a backside tailslide. Your front foot should be in the same position as for a b/s tailslide, only a little more towards your heel edge so you can get a nice flip. Snap your ollie and do a kickflip while turning your hips backside. In the same motion that you catch the flip with your back foot, you should be planting that back foot over the edge of the obstacle. Once you're on there, keep your hips 90 degrees to the object and your torso parallel with it. Slide as long as possible and drop off as you shift your hips back to forward. Now do it again.

Manuals
Manuals are great tricks, being easy and hard at the same time. There are two types of them. One is the regular manual where you go on your back wheels with your tail and the front wheels not touching the ground. This is kinda hard, but you should get it pretty fast. The other type is the nose wheelie where you go on your front wheels with your nose and the back wheels not touching the ground. This is really hard, and if you screw up, you'll be lying on the floor, thinking about how stupid that looks. Good luck!

Nollie
A nollie is a fakie, switch ollie. Switch means that if your regular do it goofy, and if your goofy do it regular. Sounds easy? Well, it's kinda hard at first, but you should get it in a few days. The important thing is that you have to practice the timing. This is a little harder since your using your akward side. Just practice this a lot and you'll get it.

Nollie flip
To do a Nollie flip, put your feet in the same position as in a nollie, but your trailing foot should be hanging off the board by about two inches on the heel side. Pop an nollie and as you slide your trailing foot forward kick it off your board to the heel side. The hard part is that you have to level it out and spin it faster then you would in a kick flip. This should make the board spin. As it finishes spining smack the board down with both feet.
Hints: Learn how to nollie perfectly before trying this move.

Nose Slide
Nose slides are pretty hard. A curb will do fine for this grind. Gain some speed, ollie, turn something like 65 degrees and land the nose on the curb. Your leading foot should be on your nose. Now, lift up your trailing foot a little and let yourself slide. When you think you slid enough pivot off and land.
Hints: If your having problems landing the nose on the curb try stalling. Just stand next to the curb, ollie, turn something like 65 and land the nose on the curb. Stay on the curb for a few seconds, pivot off and land. Do that a few times and you'll be able to do the real grind perfectly.

Ollie Impossible
What happens in an ollie impossible is the board turns 360 vertically. There are two ways to do it. One is where it wraps around your back foot, and two is where you have to suck your feet up to your chin. This is how you do it: Your feet should be in kickflip position, except your front foot should barely be on the board. The toe of your back foot should be "grasping" the heel side of the board. Now, pop the board as hard as you possibly can and make a scooping motion to the front of the board with your back foot. While your doing that, move your front foot to the side so it wouldn't be in the way, but don't make the board flip. Now jump as high as you can. Your board should now be wrapping around your back foot. Once it finishes wrapping around your foot, smack it down and land. And all that has to happen in less then a second. The second way is exactly the same except that the board doesn't wrap around your foot. You have to do exactly the same thing except that you have to suck your feet up as high as you can. One thing about this trick though. This is another one of those tricks where it's extremely easy to break your balls. So either don't do it, be really careful, or wear the only peice of equipment your really need: a cup.

Ollie Manual
The ollie manual is a good trick to help develop your balance and ollie control. The idea is to ollie and land on your back wheels, riding a "wheelie" for a distance before setting the front wheels down. It can be done on the flat ground or over an object, but is most commonly done up onto an element, like a curb or block. It requires a fair sense of balance, and you should be comfortable ollieing. It might be good to get accustomed to manualling on flat ground before ollieing onto something, but a curb is a good element on which to learn the ollie manual. Ride at the curb at a normal ollie speed - you'll want to go fast enough to get up onto the curb and still have momentum for the manual. Pop into an ollie and get up over the curb. Instead of levelling the board in the air beneath you, keep your leading foot up and your weight centered over the back wheels. The lower you pop your ollie, still clearing the element of course, the smoother you will land on your back wheels and the easier it will be to gain balance once on those wheels. Once on them there back wheels, you'll notice your body arched forward over your board as you ride the manual. This is how you keep your weight balanced on the back wheels. It is useful to try and manual a set distance, like to a line on the sidewalk or off the curb again. This will give you something specific to strive for until you've got the ollie manual so wired that you can just ride it for days. Then you can try variations like the ollie manual to kickflip off of an element, or even the ollie flip to manual. The options are endless.

Power Slides
There are two types of power slides. Tail power slides (medium difficulty) and nose power slides (easy difficulty). Power slides are when you do a 180 on the board without taking the wheels off the ground (you can also do em 90 for a type of a brake, but you have to balance yourself, or you'll end up doing a face plant). I love power slides cause they make that sound. Try the nose power slides first, they're easier. Put your leading foot on the nose and your trailing foot somewhere else on the board. Then just do a 180 and if your having trouble pick the tail up a little (push on the nose). Tail power slides are much harder. To do em, you have to put your feet on the bolts and turn with your whole body. It's kinda hard at first. Oh yeah, you have to do Power Slides moving.

Shove-It
To do a shove-it, put your feet in the same position as in an ollie. Pop an ollie, but as you jump of the board push your trailing foot to the heel side. This should make the board spin. Unlike in an ollie don't slide your leading foot forward, just keep it in place. This will make the board level out eventually. As the board finishes spinning 180 smack it down with both feet.
Tips: All this move needs is practice. Once you get really good at shoving try doing a shove it tail grab and a 360 shove it. If you do, remember to sort of pick a point and make the board spin around that point. It'll keep the board from flying away from your feet.

Smith Grind
Smith Grinds are one of the hardest grinds. What you have to do for this is ollie on a surface. Your back truck should be on the surface as should the middle of your board. It's kind of hard to get, and do.
Hints: If your having problems landing the grind on the surface try stalling. Just stand next to the curb, pop an ollie, land the back truck, and the middle of the board on the curb and pivot off. Do that a few times and you'll be able to do the real grind perfectly.

Tailslide
The tailslide is a trick that, although difficult, can be learned in stages and worked up to. It is useful to be comfortable with the frontside 180 ollie, though you won't need to turn around all the way. Practice landing in the tailslide position by riding at the curb slowly and ollieing frontside. Get just your tail over the curb and put your weight on that tail as you plant it on that curb, leaving your trucks and wheels hanging off the edge. Once you're comfortable landing in that position, try it with a little more speed and roll at the curb almost parallel to it. The faster you go and the more parallel you are to the curb, the longer you'll slide. Once you do get the hang of sliding, get a feel for how long you can push it before the tail slows down and locks in place. You'll want to begin shifting your weight back over the board as it slows down so that you can come off the curb with at least some speed, before it stops completely. Once you have the frontside ollie tailslide wired on curbs, take it to a ledge or something a little taller. Also, try swinging your torso frontside as you ollie into the tailside position, and instead of shifting your weight back over the nose to come off the object, push the tail ahead of you to finish the frontside 180 motion initiated at the start of the trick.





Ramp


BACKSIDE 50-50 - on transition
This is a great trick to learn as it will open doors to a bunch of other coping tricks. You might want to try stalling up there before you try the grind; it will get you used to your weight placement. Roll up to the transition with a decent amount of speed. Charge straight up the transition, and as your back truck gets right near the coping, you want to turn so that your heel edge wheel rolls on top of the coping. As you do this, you want to put your weight over that heel edge to get you up on top of the coping. Once you're standing pretty much on top of the coping, set your front truck down. All that's left to do to finish off the stall is drop back in by lifting up your front truck and kickturning into the tranny. In order not to hang up, make sure you put enough weight on the toe edge of your tail so that your heel edge wheel can roll back over the coping without any trouble. Once you have the stall down, the grinding part is pretty basic. You just need a little more speed, and as you approach the coping, you want to be at an angle rather than rolling straight up to it. That way your momentum will pull you along the coping. Once you're grinding, just ride it as far as you can, then drop back in as you did with the stall.

BACKSIDE AIR
Forget about early grabs. You'll never go big, and people might laugh. Start by trying some backside kickturns up near the coping and grabbing your board just in front of your front foot. You should be compressed with your knees bent, so it should not require much effort to reach your board. Once you get the feel for grabbing your board, you can start trying airs. Go up the wall at a very slight angle. Don't carve too much at first because your board will tend to fly away from you. As you approach the coping, your front wheels should start coming off of the wall at the same time as your hand reaches down for your board, which is the same as the kickturn. As your back wheels hit the coping, put the slightest pressure on your back foot, almost scooping it upward. This will help bring your board into your hand, as well as sending you in the right direction, which is up. You are in the air now with your body facing the coping. Stay calm, stay compressed. Your back foot should steer your board in a nice arc facing you back into the ramp. As you come back in, suck your legs back under you to land nice and smooth on the vert. Go bigger on the next wall. P.S. This is definitely a "less is more" type of trick. Don't try to ollie grab into it or go huge at first. Land some small, mellow ones, then work your way up.

FRONTSIDE 5-0 - on transition
Don't fool yourself, kids, a frontside 5-0 does not consist of a kickturn on the coping. You have to get up on top of that thing and scrape some metal off your trucks. To do this, or even attempt this, see that you can do a frontside 50-50 so you're comfortable with the feeling of the transition being behind you. When you've gathered your courage, pump towards the tranny going all fast. Start to turn and throw your body weight frontside, to get you momentum going that way, about a foot below the lip. Then, just lock your back truck onto the copes like you would for a 5-0 on a ledge. Once you get comfortable with balancing in that position, you can grind frontside 5-0 for days. Going down escalators is the best (no, not the kind in the mall).

FRONTSIDE 50-50 - on transition
For some, the frontside 50-50 is easier than backside, but for most it's more intimidating having your back face down the transition. Once you get over this fear, though, a whole new world of frontside coping tricks is opened up to you. Doesn't that sound appealing? Now that you're anxious to expand your ramp skating, let's get started. Just as with the backside 50-50, learning the stall first will help. Cruise straight up the transition, but as you get right near the coping you want to turn to get your toe edge wheel of the back truck over the coping rather than the heel edge wheel. With the frontside stall, it's important to get that toe edge wheel as far over the coping as possible to allow yourself some stability while your up on the lip. Just like with the backside stall, get on your back truck first then set down the front truck, placing your weight predominantly on the toe side of the board. To drop back in, just do a little kick turn into the tranny. Remember, don't let your toe edge wheels hang up. Now, to grind rather than stall you're going to need more speed and remember to approach the coping at an angle so your momentum will take you along the coping instead of just straight up and out.

FRONTSIDE AIR
You want to be comfortable grinding or kickturning frontside before you huck your first frontside air. As with backside airs, early grabs are not recommended. You'll naturally tend to reach AROUND your knees for your board, or BETWEEN them. Reach around them if possible, because habits can be hard to break and you don't want a stink bug habit to start in the first place. Go up the wall at a slight angle, with your shoulders facing the coping. You should have enough speed going to do an air, but don't go so fast that you lose control every time you get in the air. As you approach the lip, you should have your knees bent, be a little tucked, and have your trailing hand starting to reach towards your board. Let your weight shift to your back foot a little bit as you come off of the coping, and your board should pop right into your waiting hand. Stay tucked and look for your landing spot. Land with your knees bent. Try to get your board to trace a smooth arc from start to finish. The higher you go, the slower you will turn in the air.

ROCK & ROLL
Before attempting this trick on a transition, you should be comfortable with kick turns and you should be able to already drop in on said transition. Approach the tranny with enough speed to get up to the coping. When you get up there, get your front truck over the coping and put pressure on your nose so you "rock" on the coping on the middle of your board. Now here's the tough part. Get your weight back onto the tail and perform a kick turn, making sure (and this is important) that your front truck is high enough to clear the coping as you swing it around. Once you've got that covered, just touch your front wheels back onto the transition and cruise on down to the flats. For some, rocks to fakie are easier to attempt first. There's no kick turn involved, but you do have be comfortable with coming back into the transition moving fakie.

SWEEPER
Roll up the transition until you hit coping. Drop your back foot on the coping while simultaneously raising your front foot with the board into a position that enables you to grab your nose. Looking over your shoulder, place the tail on the coping as you hop off your back foot to get it back onto the board as you drop back in. It should all be done in one smooth motion.

 


Bennihanna:

1) go up a quarter/half pipe at normal speed.
2) as you are coming off the coping drop your back leg off the board and drop
it straight down but make sure you dont kick the ramp.
3)pull the board up so that its lined horizontilly under your front leg.
4) hold for a few seconds and then pull your back leg back onto the board and
roll back down the pipe.


Method grab:

Go up any kind of ramp at normal speed. When you launch into the air kinda
kick the board up behind you but be carefull it doesn't slip away. Once it is
behind reach your arm behind you and grab it in the center of the board. Hold
it for a few seconds and then bring the board back down like normal and roll
away.

 

 skateboarding in the U.K.